Bloomberg announces 2020 campaign bid

By Liya Davidov
Nation & World Editor

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his 2020 presidential campaign on Nov. 24. According to CNN, he will run as a Democrat and aim to defeat President Donald Trump. 

“I just wanted to briefly tell you why I’ve decided to enter this race,” Bloomberg wrote in a letter on his candidacy website. “I’m running for president to defeat Donald Trump and to unite and rebuild America. It’s really that simple.”

The former mayor says he will run (YouTube).

His late bid into the 2020 running poses a new level of uncertainty just three months before the first round of voting begins, according to CNN. 

However, Bloomberg is not the only late bidder. Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick also said that he will run as a Democratic candidate, according to CNN. 

Bloomberg’s aides said that due to his late entry, he will not compete in the first four voting contests, which will take place in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina, according to CNN. His plan is to build support in the states that hold primaries on “Super Tuesday” on March 3. In the meantime, the first opportunity for Bloomberg to debate will be this month, according to CNN.

According to The New York Times, Bloomberg has already invested over $35 million in multimedia advertisements, in which he outlines his biography and political intentions.

“‘I offer myself as a doer and a problem solver not a talker,’” Bloomberg said, according to The New York Times. “‘And someone who is ready to take on the tough fights — and win.’”

His candidacy plans to strengthen the middle class and create good paying jobs in renewable energy and other industries, according to ABC News. In addition, there is a focus on education and an interest in more lenient attitudes toward immigration policies. 

According to ABC News, when Bloomberg spoke in Phoenix on Nov. 26, he said that “‘ripping kids away from their parents is a disgrace.’”

Bloomberg carries with him into his candidacy previous “political baggage” that includes “a complex array of business entanglements, a history of making demeaning comments about women and a record of championing law enforcement policies that disproportionately targeted black and Latino men with invasive searches,” according to The New York Times. 

On Nov. 17, Bloomberg addressed a church congregation in New York, expressing his regret for his implementation of the “‘stop-and-frisk’” policy during his mayoral term, according to ABC News. The policy gave police the authority to detain criminal suspects, but resulted in biases by white policemen toward people of color. 

“‘I can’t change history,’” Bloomberg said, according to ABC News. “‘However today, I want you to know that I realize back then I was wrong.’”

His candidacy has an opportunity to influence the primary in a number of ways. According to The New York Times, Joe Biden and Pete Buttigeig, who currently lead the  Democratic  candidates, have political vulnerabilities along with their limited finances, as opposed to Bloomberg’s millions.

Despite his resources, Bloomberg is aware of the challenges he faces as he progresses with his campaign. At 77 years old, Bloomberg will join Biden and Bernie Sanders as one of the oldest to assume the presidency if elected.

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