Students perform original standup routines

By Kevin Doyle
Correspondent

Nick Zelte, a sophomore biology major, lumbered onto the Traditions stage in his Boston College sweatshirt ready to crack a few jokes about his narcolepsy, his mother and the Lifetime television channel known for its cliche soap operas during CUB Alt’s Student Comedy Night on Oct. 19 in the Traditions Lounge.

Zelte jokes about his narcolepsy throughout his set. (Meagan McDowell / Photo Editor)

Nick’s mother, Karen Zelte, was the main focus of his comedic set. She works as a nurse in a prison nearby, which gave her son with the perfect material for the show.

“I feel like I can go to prison with all the advice my mom has given me,” Zelte said.

He mentioned how some prisoners were stabbed multiple times and, to avoid facing trouble, they used the excuse that they had simply fallen down the stairs.

Zelte then talked about how his narcolepsy is triggered by the simple lulling sound of a car engine. He described his mother as an “abnormal superhuman” since she often has to lift him up out of the car and carry him to his bed — her strength probably fueled by frustration because of his spontaneous napping.

“I’m a weird person and weird things tend to happen to me sometimes,” Zelte said.

He then smoothly transitioned into talking about the Lifetime movies he and his mother watch together. Zelte jokingly observed that all the protagonists on Lifetime movies are oblivious white women unaware of the violence that occurs around them.

“When you’re in the suburbs everyone mysteriously dies — and in unrealistic ways like falling down the stairs and dying on the last step,” said Zelte.

Sean Delanoy, a senior interdisciplinary business major, ended the show with relatable jokes about going to the gym, parties and his grandparents. Delanoy’s material is inspired by personal experiences or ideas that randomly pop into his head.

He proudly stated that he has not been to the gym at all during his four years at the College, except for when, recently, he was forced to enter through its doors as part of a group project.

“As I was checking in, I was scared that they would think my ID was stolen since I’ve never been here before,” Delanoy said.