Learn the facts before you protest

Ahh, new logo. How much does the campus community hate thee? Let us count the ways … or not.

See, here at The Signal, we receive letter upon letter upon letter about “just how awful that stupid shield really is.” While this is a perfectly valid assertion, the evidence used to support many of these opinions is … slightly off.

This is to say: It’s good to have an opinion, simply because it’s good to care about something. It’s good to express your opinions. It’s good to let those in charge know how you feel. It is not good, however, to justify your feelings with misinformation. To illustrate, here are some facts that people seem to forget when talking about the College’s graphic identity:

(1) Budget cuts have nothing to do with the new graphic identity. The College did not waste millions of dollars creating its new image. Money, allocated before McGreevey came out and said ‘no money for you,” was used to hire a design company to reinvent the image of the College in general. North Charles Street Design, a national publication firm, was chosen by College. The logo is one part of this pre-paid package that also includes new admissions brochures and other various campus publications.

(2) Jesse Rosenblum did not design the new graphic identity. He is simply required to talk about as part of his job as Vice President for College Relations.

(3) SAF stands for Student Activity Fee, not Student Activity Fund. Programming at the College is not “funded” by the budget. It is “funded” by the $113 fee that all students must pay at the beginning of each school year as part of their tuition. Translate this to mean the new graphic identity will not hurt SAF-funded clubs and organizations because they come from a different line of the budget. If the College had saved money and not commissioned the logo, that money still wouldn’t go to clubs.

Realize this: it is important to understand things thoroughly. It is important to know your facts before you start running at the mouth.

That way, your arguments are taken more seriously by those who need to them.

Editorial opinions are those of the editorial board, which is composed of the Editor-in-chief, the Managing Editor, the Senior Editor and the Opinions Editor unless otherwise noted.