All posts by Thomas Ciccone

Arts & Entertainment Editor

Waldron fields student concerns

Jerome Waldron, one of the three candidates that is being considered for the College’s chief information officer position, spoke and answered questions in the Library Auditorium on Thursday, Feb. 23.

The question and answer session came at the end of a two-day period in which Waldron met with the College’s faculty, staff, Student Government Association, deans, IT staff and cabinet.

Waldron has had an extensive career at Salisbury University, doing everything from academic counseling and lecturing in classes, to rising from an Associate Registrar to Salisbury’s current Chief Information Officer.

Many students expressed their concerns to Waldron about the lack of wireless internet in some of the College’s buildings, as well as unreliable cell phone coverage in certain areas on campus, such as the lower basement floor of the library.

“Inconsistent was the word I heard a lot,” Waldron said.

Waldron noted a possible solution to the problem, where at Salisbury University they recently installed a cell-phone tower to improve students’ connectivity.

Waldron also fielded questions and concerns about the College’s SOCS system, a student resource that has given individuals trouble recently.

Salisbury University uses Blackboard, an alternative option to SOCS, and Waldron stressed that there were many other options available, such as open source programs like Saki and Moodle.

“A lot of these things operate the same way but they are different,” Waldron said, “And then there’s always the campus policy.”

During his visit to the College, Waldron also met with SGA and IT, who had voiced concerns about Safe Connect, the College’s infamous internet connection interface that has garnered numerous complaints recently.

“We use a different system,” Waldron said, noting that their system doesn’t quarantine users or time out its connection in the middle of a browsing session, but he stressed how similar Salisbury’s interface is to Safe Connect, and how relevant Safe Connect is.

According to Waldron, systems like Safe Connect exist to protect the campus’s extensive internet network.

“There are some configuration adjustments that can be made,” Waldron said, but warned that certain adjustments can compromise network security. “It’s a policy decision,” Waldron said.

Waldron commented on how surprised and excited he was to see how many people of the College were interested about the future of the College’s technological progress.

“I was blown away by the number of people I met in those two days.” Waldron said. “This is something that your school is taking very seriously.”

Ewing and the College team up

Despite tensions over the past year, the College and Ewing Township are looking to come together. A press conference was held on Wednesday, Feb. 29 in Loser Hall that addressed the formation of a new committee focused on integrating the College with the surrounding community.

Ewing Mayor Bert Steinmann opened up the press conference, speaking strongly about the aims of the committee to bring the community closer to campus life.

“Hopefully every step we take is going to be a step forward,” said Steinmann, who emphasized that the goals of the committee were positive.

“Aiming with the help of (President R. Barbara Gitenstein), I know we’re going to forge a very, very good partnership for the future,” Steinmann said.

Gitenstein also spoke at the press conference, stressing the importance of forming the committee, referred to as the “Town-Gown Committee.”

“TCNJ is in Ewing, and so we need to partner with Ewing,” Gitenstein said. “We’re all better if we work together.”

Gitenstein mentioned that Ewing was recently rated by The Atlantic as the eighth most economic town in the U.S., stressing the positive consequences of the College being situated in such a “thriving area.”

Gitenstein did however make note that the committee would have to deal with tense matters, such as student conduct.

The Town-Gown Committee is scheduled to meet four times a year at differing locations both at the College and in the Ewing area. The first meeting is tentatively planned to be later this month or in early April.

The committee will be comprised of 12 positions, including vice president for Student Affairs Vickey Triponey, associate dean of students Angela Lauer Chong, executive director of College Relations Stacey Schuster, president of Student Government Olaniyi Solebo and a representative from the College’s campus police. The sixth position will be filled by a College official according to each meeting’s discussed issues.

The other six committee members will be provided the Ewing township, including Ewing Mayor Bert Steinmann, business administrator James McManimon, a representative from the town council, Ewing police and others chosen by Ewing officials. According to Schuster, the meetings will have open and closed sessions, allowing the public to be more involved.

Career services talks job options: Transferrable skills are key in workforce

By Tom Ciccone
News Editor

Students were shown the multitude of career possibilities available when graduating with an English major when Lynette Harris, assistant director of the College’s Career Center and liaison for the school of arts and communication and the school of humanities and social sciences, gave her presentation “Marketing Your Transferrable Skills: Making Them Work for You” in the Business Building on Thursday, Feb. 23.

The event, sponsored by the English honor society Sigma Tau Delta and the Career Services office, focused on the best tips for nailing job interviews, marketing personal skills to employers, as well as learning to network with companies.

Harris started off the presentation by asking how many students in the room were once told that no jobs were left in the employment market, to which most of the students in the room raised their hands.

“It is a myth,” Harris said.

Not only are jobs available, Harris said, but the average amount of jobs a person will have in their lifetime is 47.

The presentation focused on the idea of “transferable skills,” such as basic communication, writing and computer skills, that translate to almost any form of employment.

“The transferable skills are going to get you the prize,” Harris said.

Harris also talked about the feasibility of graduating with an English degree, informing the students about many of the jobs available to graduates, such as working in publishing and news organizations, pursuing work in the education system and being employed in many other positions in public relations, law and banking.

Harris also stressed the importance of researching the companies before you apply for job interviews with them.

Many students asked questions about Career Services Spring Career and Internship Day that is scheduled to take place in the Brower Student Center on March 16.

Harris offered some simple tips to guarantee strong first impressions with employers, such as sending out thank you emails to show sincerity and interest in the company.

“That is very lasting,” Harris said. “They’ll remember that.”

When asked on how to dress for the event, Harris replied, “Just remember, you’re going to the career fair not the club.”

More information about the Career and Internship Day can be found on the Career Services’s website.

Professor talks growing Italian crime group

Some of the most powerful business interests originate from the oldest forms of organized crime.

College professor of Italian Simona Wright presented her lecture “Globalization According to Organized Crime” to students in the Business Building Lounge on Tuesday, Feb. 21.

Wright focused on the Camorra, a southern Italian group of organized crime syndicates based in Campagna, Italy.

According to Wright, the Camorra were originally “very fragmented … There was no real organization behind it.”

Wright speaks about organized crime group. (Photo by Amy Sachs)

Through the centuries, however, the Camorra began to organize, becoming more expansive and powerful, and at one point they even adopted their own statute, or code of conduct.

“The Camorra were trying to develop their own identity,” Wright said.

Through influence of government and other various forms of corruption and illegal activity, the Camorra rose to power in Naples.

“They truly became the police of Naples,” Wright said. “Many political leaders were actually killed by the Camorra for not delivering on their promises.”

Wright began to connect the Camorra’s extensive history to the present day, noting that the United States even supported the mafia by enlisting their help during the second world war.

Today, the Camorra are responsible for much of Campagna’s waste management and real estate development, which has resulted in disastrous and destructive consequences.

According to Wright, the Camorra make over $200 million every business quarter through tax evasion.

“The people of Campagna are victims of a system that allows this crime to happen,” Wright said.


Insight given on off-campus life

Insight given on off-campus life
A diverse panel of students in different living situations offered various tips for dealing with landlords, contracts, neighbors and housemates.

By Tom Ciccone

News Editor

Students considering moving off-campus were taught the do’s and don’ts of venturing beyond the borders of the College at an information session titled “Decoding Off-Campus Living” on Thursday, Feb. 16.

A panel took questions from students concerning finding fair rental leases, dealing with negligent landlords and spotting irresponsible housemates.

The panel consisted of Magda Manetas, dean of students; Dan Frieri, a 2011 alum of the College; Chris Lagoeiro, a student of the College who manages his own properties off-campus; John Zoppina, a student that has commuted to the College since his freshman year and Megan Coburn, a junior mathematics and secondary education double major, who currently lives in an off-campus house.

Frieri, who makes money renting off-campus properties to current students, stressed the importance of analyzing all the details in a lease to rent a house.

“It’s important that you read over your lease very well, maybe even with a lawyer,” Frieri said. “It has to be a one-set price for everyone. You need to take consideration that when you are signing a contract. You need to be able to count on your roommates to make their payments because you are liable for that.”

Frieri warned of an incident where all of the housemates were relying on one person to handle all of their payments. The money was mishandled, and the roommates were fined for not handing in their payments on time.

Some leases set fines for missing rent payments differently. One lease can have fines at 10 percent of the month’s rent payment, while others can set their fines at 10 percent of the total lease. The percentage of the fine can also vary greatly from lease to lease, Frieri said.

A lot of leases also set expectations for renters to take care of the property’s lawn as well as remove snow after inclement weather. However, lawn mowers and snow shovels often aren’t provided with the property being rented.

The panel also stressed the importance of maintaining healthy relationships with neighbors.

“I would say knock on your neighbors’ houses. Just try to be polite and friendly,” Coburn, a student who lives off campus, said.

Frieri added, “I highly advise you don’t park in front of your neighbor’s house. It is legal, but don’t do it. They’ll come after you.”

Manetas, dean of students, stressed the importance of recognizing that neighbors are likely to not be students, but employed commuters who operate on very different sleep schedules.

“I think the biggest conflict is that your lifestyle at this point is so different from your neighbors,” Manetas said. “You’re there for a couple of years at the most — they might have lived there their whole lives. Be cognizant of that.”

Coburn warned of the dangers of having serious safety issues in an imperfect house. For example, Coburn talked about a shower stall in her house that was falling apart and leaving electrical wiring exposed to water.

“You should prioritize your complaints,” Manetas said. “Health and safety are important. Cosmetic issues with the house are less important.”

Frieri added that broken heaters in the winter should be an immediate priority for landlords to get fixed.

The College has multiple resources for students who are having problems communicating with their landlord and getting fixes made to their house. Students can send emails to student advocates who provide legal advice and can be reached at advocate@tcnj.edu. More information about student advocates is on the Student Government website.

A group called the Off-Campus Student Organization is also available to help students who have problems with their off-campus living. The group can be reached at ocso@tcnj.edu.

SFB funds Nowruz, overcoming obstacles event

Student Finance Board

Student Finance Board funded multiple new events this week, including a Nowruz event that will celebrate the Persian New Year.

The Student Finance Board granted the Central Eurasian and Middle Eastern Studies Society $3,587 to host their second annual Nowruz event, celebrating the Persian New Year at the College on Monday, March 19.

“We want to bring the holiday here to the College,” said sophomore international studies major Jessica Sparano. “It was very successful last year.”

The Amir Vahab Band is booked to perform at the event, where they will perform traditional Middle Eastern music. Middle Eastern foods and deserts will be featured along with traditional Nowruz practices, such as the Haft-Sin ceremony of symbolically setting tables.

SFB requested quotes from the King’s Pita Palace and Cairo Cakes restaurants but CEMES’s representatives said the traditional restaurants did not offer financial quotes of their services for SFB to examine. The funding was granted regardless.

SFB awarded $2,500 to the Chabad club to have their “Purim Gone Wild” concert and dinner event in the Rathskeller on Tuesday, Feb. 28.

Musical performer De Scribe is booked to perfom at the event, accounting for the $2,500 dollars that was requested from SFB. De Scribe had originally asked for $3,500, but later accepted a lesser fee.

SFB passed a resolution to give $1,500 to the Student Government’s class councils for an event focused on enhancing mental health and awareness among the College’s students. The event is called “Overcoming Obstacles,” and the class councils requested the $1,500 to have Mike Donahue of R25 Productions speak to students of the College.

When asked why they chose Donahue to speak at the event, freshman chemistry and secondary education double major Brain Garsh said, “He was one of the more powerful speakers. He has a strong presence.”

The event is set to be held in the library auditorium, but representatives for the class councils said the location may be changed if attendance is higher than expected.

SFB granted $480 to fund the Art Student Association’s Silk Screening Workshop that will be held on March 14 in the Art and Multimedia Building’s Room 125. The workshop is meant to teach students how to print designs on T-shirts.

T-shirts were purposely included in the funding so that students wouldn’t have to pay for the shirts if they chose to try out the silk-screening process, senior graphic design major Lindsey Hardifer said.

SFB also awarded $396 to the College’s Deaf Hearing Connection organization to host “DHC Presents the movie: “Children of a Lesser God” on Wednesday, March 21 in the Brower Student Center food court.

The funds will be spent to have permission to show the film, though the DHC will not have permission to show the film again after the event. The Oscar-winning “Children of a Lesser God” is one of actress Marlee Matlin’s most popular films, and the showing is meant to promote the actress’s visit to the College on April 4.

SFB also passed a resolution to fund a collaborative mural project titled “Before I Die.” A chalkboard-like banner will be displayed, depending on weather, on Quimby’s Prairie (Green Hall lawn) or in the student center, for students of the College to write their own bucket-list goals.

“The project is meant to question the aims of art and will be very collaborative with students of the College,” Hardifer said.

SFB approved the creation of the Spanish Club, a group designed for students of the College to participate in cultural activities and get involved with the local Hispanic community.

Voicing concerns can cause change

News Editor Tom Ciccone shares his less-than-pleasant experience living in Centennial Hall and his appreciation for the power of petitions.

Living in Centennial Hall this semester was definitely worse than I thought it would be. The bathrooms are never cleaned, the internet always glitches and for months I was awoken three hours before my alarm by the sound of jack hammers at the construction zone where the new education building is being constructed.

So I wasn’t surprised when Residential Education and Housing decided to grant Centennial residents a 20 percent better probability of receiving a housing lottery timeslot.

I’m sure there are students who live in New Residence, Norsworthy, Decker and, hell, even Eickhoff who have their own words to rant about their living conditions. Still, the truth is Centennial was a disaster this semester.

On top of the negligent nature that cleaning services has treated all the communal bathrooms with, multiple acts of vandalism have made the living conditions of Centennial borderline health hazardous.

During one weekend a student, or students, left fecal matter and vomit all over the floor of a shower stall in the men’s floor’s bathroom. It wasn’t until Tuesday that the mess was cleaned up, so some people actual had to shower a couple of feet from festering human defecation.

Every Tuesday morning, I walk back from The Signal’s production office, after having worked for about 20 hours straight. As I take a bitter, cold shower, I often find myself reminiscing of the days I lived in Cromwell. Oh, how luxurious those freshman memories were.

I can understand if everyone wants a better chance at housing like Centennial residents do, but then again, Centennial residents were the only students on campus to formally petition ResLife about the inhumane living conditions that Centennial obviously disintegrated into.

If anything, you have to admit that when a lot of people work together over a serious problem, the bureaucracy sometimes listens. In this case, that’s exactly what happened.

There are plenty of problems with the other dormitory buildings on campus, but Centennial residents have been dealing with some seriously irresponsible building maitenance.

And the whole reason why housing is so tight this year is because of Cromwell renovations. I say, it’s about time. Next year they should fix Centennial too. Or knock it down.

Cent gets lead in lottery

Centennial residents now have a 70 percent chance of receiving a housing lottery time slot following a petition. (Tim Lee / Staff Photographer)

Students of Centennial Hall just caught a lucky break.

Centennial residents will be receiving a 20 percent increase in the probability of receiving a housing lottery time slot, Residential Education and Housing announced on Thursday, Feb. 16.

The decision follows a petition signed by students complaining about the living conditions in one of the College’s older dormitories (built in 1955).

An information session was held in the building’s main lounge, where students voiced complaints — the most common ones pertaining to the neglected sanitation of the community bathrooms.

A community survey was emailed to Centennial residents on Feb. 2, and according to ResLife’s email, “The survey results suggested that the community was most interested in the first lottery enhancement suggestion.”

As a result, Centennial residents now have a 70 percent chance of receiving a housing lottery time slot, as compared to the 50 percent chance they were originally given, according to the email.

The email also stated that facilities is using “feasibility studies” to see if other proposed renovations can be utilized, such as improving the building’s wireless internet, installing extra electrical outlets and toilets in the community bathrooms, as well as adding the second floor library door as an alternative entrance to the dormitory.

Evangelicals return to the College

Video by Matt Mance / Photo Assistant.

Three men representing the First Baptist Church of Patchogue, Long Island came to preach their religious beliefs at the College’s campus. While two of the three men refused to identify themselves, one of the men said his name was Mike Stockwell, a resident of Somerset, N.J. When asked if he was currently employed, he refused to answer any more questions.

Norovirus outbreak prompts warning

Picture of a sanitized door at Rider's campus.

Because of Rider’s Norovirus outbreak, their campus sanitization measures have greatly increased.

A nasty bug is roaming around campuses in N.J.

The College community received an email from Student Health Services on Thursday, Feb. 9 about a suspected outbreak of Norovirus at Rider University.

Norovirus is a highly contagious stomach virus and “is often called by other names, such as viral gastroenteritis, stomach flu and food poisoning,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

“We typically see cases this time of the year,” Janice Vermeychuk, director of Student Health Services, said in an email interview. “It is business as usual.”

Despite rumors on campus, there have been no confirmed cases of Norovirus on the College’s campus, with all tests for the virus being negative, Vermeychuk said.

Outbreaks of the virus have already occurred on Princeton University’s campus.

“We have had cases of gastroenteritis illness,” Martin Mbugua, a Princeton University Spokesman, said. “We’ve had samples tested and they came up positive with Norovirus.”

Since Jan. 29, there have been about 140 cases. Some samples tested positive for gastroenteritis, at which point it was assumed that Norovirus was present on the campus, Mbugua said.

Rider University’s campus has also dealt with about 120 cases since the end of January, according to Dan Higgins, executive director of university communications.

Characteristics of being infected with Norovirus are “abrupt onset of vomiting accompanied by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps and nausea,” Student Health Services’s email said.

Student Health Services also said that such symptoms can last anywhere from 24 to 60 hours and if someone is experiencing the symptoms, they should contact Student Health Services or their personal health care provider.

The email listed a number of hygienic practices known to reduce the risk of spreading this gastrointestinal illness.

Washing one’s hands thoroughly before and after eating, typing on a computer keyboard, operating exercise Dehydration can also be a serious problem for people afflicted with Norovirus and is also very contagious.

Norovirus can spread very rapidly in closed areas, and people infected with it can be contagious from the point they experience symptoms, to as long as two weeks after their symptoms cease, according to the CDCP’s website.

Because there are no vaccines or drugs available to treat Norovirus, infected persons are highly recommended to drink lots of fluids, which are lost from excessive diarrhea and vomiting that occur when infected with the virus.

Study abroad conference

Study abroad conference

Michelle Teng (center), a student of the College, shares her experiences at the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji.

Montclaire State University hosted a day long conference for study abroad alumni, focusing on how students could take advantage of their study abroad experiences professionally.

The conference hosted a number of students from the College and other N.J. academic institutions as well as representatives from the Peace Corps.

Many activities were held, including a resume review, where students had their resumes edited. Discussion tables allowed students to discuss their experiences with other study abroad alumni.

Norovirus outbreak at Rider prompts campus-wide warning

The College community received an email from Student Health Services on Thursday Feb. 9 about a suspected outbreak of Norovirus at Rider University.

According to the email, there have been no indications of such an outbreak on the College’s campus, but Health Services did recommend that students take extra personal caution by maintaining serious hygienic practices.

Outbreaks of the virus have already occurred on Princeton University’s campus.

“We have had cases of gastroenteritis illness,” Martin Mbugua, a Princeton University Spokesman, said. “We’ve had samples tested and they came up positive with Norovirus.”

Since Jan. 29, there have been about 110 cases. Some samples tested positive for gastroenteritis, at which point it was assumed that Norovirus was present on the campus, Mbugua said.

Rider University’s campus has also dealt with about fifty cases since the end of January, with 11 students being hospitalized last night, according to The Star Ledger. Representatives at Rider’s Student Health Services refused to comment.

Characteristics of being infected with Norovirus are “abrupt onset of vomiting accompanied by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps and nausea,” the email said. Student Health Services also said that such symptoms can last anywhere from 24 to 60 hours and if someone is experiencing the symptoms, they should contact Student Health Services or their personal health care provider.

The email listed a number of hygienic practices known to reduce the risk of spreading this gastrointestinal illness. Washing one’s hands thoroughly before and after eating, typing on a computer keyboard, operating exercise equipment and using the bathroom or any other shared item were all mentioned.

Student Health Services also recommended avoiding contact with sick persons, taking off from classes, sports and other obligations when sick and avoiding sharing towels, eating utensils, food, beverages and containers with other people. Getting proper sleep, exercise, diet and fluid intake were also recommended in the email.

Norovirus is a highly contagious stomach virus and “is often called by other names, such as viral gastroenteritis, stomach flu and food poisoning,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

Dehydration can also be a serious problem for people afflicted with Norovirus and is also very contagious. Norovirus can spread very rapidly in closed areas, and people infected with it can be contagious from the point they experience symptoms, to as long as two weeks after their symptoms cease, according to the CDCP’s website.

Because there are no vaccines or drugs available to treat Norovirus, infected persons are highly recommended to drink lots of fluids, which are lost from excessive diarrhea and vomiting that occur when infected with the virus.

Student Health Services’s email included a link provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that includes more information about Norovirus. Student Health Services also recommended students call 609-771-2889 or email health@tcnj.edu for further information.

Payroll system upgraded

Synch-Solutions, a member of the Oracle Partner Network, recently completed an upgrade of the College’s PeopleSoft Human Capital Management system.

The company was brought in as an outside hire to help manage the transfer of data as the system underwent an upgrade from version 8.9 to version 9.1, said Matthew Golden, vice president of college relations and advancement.

The HCM system is responsible for many of the College’s financial processes including managing payments of all of the College’s employees.

The mandatory upgrade happened this November and was utilized as an opportunity for the College to increase efficiency in the various business processes that the HCM system handles, Golden said.

Many new features were added to the system’s new version, including online W-2 forms for filing taxes, more efficient and automated set-up for users, as well as an enhanced flexibility in managing worker health benefits.

“This is the system where (the College) hires employees, processes benefits and calculate compensation related to student, faculty, and staff paychecks,” Golden said.

A self-service component is included in the system that allows faculty and staff of the College to view paychecks, review work benefits and edit personal information.

The system is also used to extract data that is used in a range of financial reports that the College is required to submit by N.J. state law.

Synch-Solutions was brought in to handle the data transfer after being selected out of multiple vendors the College was considering, Golden said.

The company utilized a “campus accelerator” management option to upgrade the College’s Oracle HCM system faster.

“Campus accelerator is Synch-Solutions’s term for moving the data from one system into another more quickly than usual,” Golden said.

Housing lottery to begin next week

Upcoming renovations of Cromwell Hall have caused the housing lottery to undergo some remodeling as well.

An email from Residential Housing and Education on Feb. 1 offered information about the housing lottery process, as well as announcing the school’s plans to use hotels near campus as an extra option for upperclassmen.

Students interested in living on campus can register for the lottery between Feb. 13 and 19, according to the email. On Feb. 21 rising sophomores will receive time slot information, and the upperclassmen find out on Feb. 22.

“There will be approximately 1,000 upper class beds available, and about 2,000 rising juniors and seniors who are eligible to apply,” said Ryan Farnkopf, director of housing operations for Residential Education and Housing. “Housing won’t know exact numbers until after the application period has ended, but I project we’ll receive about 1,400-1,500 applications.”

Rising sophomores, who are all guaranteed housing, will be placed in Decker Hall, Eickhoff Hall, New Residence Hall, Centennial Hall, Brewster Hall and most of Townhouses West, while rising juniors and seniors, who receive time slots, can choose from Townhouses East, Townhouses South, Hausdoerffer Hall, Phelps Hall, the College Houses and parts of the Townhouses West, the ResEd email said.

Because of Cromwell Hall’s closure, Norsworthy, Allen and Ely Halls will be used for first year housing, Farnkopf confirmed.

Three years ago there was a similar shortage in spots when Decker Hall underwent renovations, resulting in sophomores living in parts of Townhouses during the 2009-2010 school year.

“It does compare to that,” said Sean Stallings, executive director of Residential Education and Housing, acknowledging the potential lack of beds for juniors and seniors. “The difference is that we have a larger sophomore class, because last year it was a very large freshman class.”

“We see that we may come up short and that’s why we started exploring the hotel option in the first place,” he said.

The Courtyard Marriott and the Element by Westin are considered top options among five hotels that are being evaluated by the College, the email said.

The Holiday Inn Princeton, the Trenton Marriott and the Churchill Corporate Services are also bidding for approval to house students of the College.

According to Stallings, the final decision is pending contracts.

Another major change to the lottery is the removal of a $100 deposit to secure students’ participation in the lottery.

Stallings said, “I’m waiving the $100 deposit because of the timing of it,” explaining how in previous years students would have such information as early as January, and now housing runs close to the time of spring break.

Expanding upon this idea, Farnkopf said in an email interview, “With the loss of Cromwell, we anticipate having more bed spaces than applications, and do not feel as though requiring a deposit is worth the effort this year.”

As defined on the housing site, a time slot is “a randomly generated date and time on which students are eligible to pick a room.  Because Housing usually receives more applications than we can accommodate, not every student receives a time slot.” Students who do not receive time slots can choose to be placed on a waiting list, and Farnkopf anticipates that a significant portion of waitlisted students will probably be removed from it before the fall begins.

ResEd plans to schedule information sessions about the various housing options and encourages students to check the housing site for updates.