All posts by Signal Contributor

Hip-hop should be in the R&R Hall of Fame

Ice Cube stands in solidarity with the hip-hop community. (AP Photo)
Ice Cube stands in solidarity with the hip-hop community. (AP Photo)

By Skyeler Sudia

A recent feud between Ice Cube and Gene Simmons has ignited some controversy as to whether or not hip-hop artists should be included in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Since rock and roll is an ever-evolving genre, excluding hip-hop artists from the hall of fame would be detrimental to the growth of music. Continue reading

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College fails to break gender disparities

The College neglects to provide stocked menstrual product dispensers in the bathrooms. (Tom Ballard / Opinions Editor)
The College neglects to provide stocked menstrual product dispensers in the bathrooms. (Tom Ballard / Opinions Editor)

By Isabelle Tan and Tabiya Ahmed

Menstruation is not only a biological function, but also part of a larger ongoing social, political and economic debate. Oftentimes, the stigma of menstruation is accepted without consideration, but it is important to critically analyze these social norms and understand how they directly impact women.

Due to the detrimental social stigmas surrounding a woman’s period, women are often denied access to income equality across the globe, whether in the form of exclusion from schooling or marginalization in higher levels of leadership and economic power. This economic inequality is further worsened as menstruating women either completely lack access to or face higher prices and taxes for menstrual products throughout the world. Continue reading

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AVI event educates students about rape culture

Students learn about ending rape culture. (Keri Fitzpatrick / Staff Photographer)
Students learn about ending rape culture. (Keri Fitzpatrick / Staff Photographer)

By Olivia Dauber
Correspondent

Students attending A Day to End Rape Culture, hosted by Anti-Violence Initiatives (AVI), on Tuesday, April 12, were immediately hit with positive energy, despite the sensitive subject matter of the expo-style event.

On the event’s Facebook page, AVI defines rape culture as “an environment in which rape is prevalent and sexual violence is normalized and excused in the media.” Continue reading

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Alumni panel discusses career opportunities in sociology

By Jamie Gerhartz                                                                                       Correspondent

Five alumni returned to the College on Wednesday, April 13, in room 326 of the Social Sciences Building, to provide insight about finding a job after graduation to current sociology majors.

Four of the panelists spoke in person, while one gave advice via video chat. The panelists talked about their lives after graduating the College and gave students advice for finding a job and what life might be like after graduating with a sociology degree. Continue reading

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TCNJ Jazz Ensemble lights up the stage

By Caleigh Carlson
Correspondent

The vibrant, pastel collared shirts of the TCNJ Jazz Ensemble were not the only elements bringing color to the stage of Kendall Hall on Friday, April 15. The tremendously talented jazz band did what they do best and put on a wonderful performance. The stage was full of friendly faces that encouraged one another like a family. An essential part of its production was the head of this family, conductor Gary Fienberg.

The jazz ensemble is led by conductor Fienberg. (Kim Iannarone / Photo Editor)
The jazz ensemble is led by conductor Fienberg. (Kim Iannarone / Photo Editor)

“If you haven’t heard this tune yet, you need to get a life,” Fienberg jokingly said as he introduced the well-known tune of “Fantasy,” by Maurice White, Verdine White and Eddie Del Barrio. Continue reading

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Artist makes connections in works

By Ashley Skowronek
Correspondent

The Department of Art and Art History welcomed a renowned art educator on Wednesday, April 13, as part of the 2015-2016 Visiting Scholar Series. The presentation guided viewers through empirical illumination by observing formal, thematic and contextual qualities palpable in works of art.

Artist Renee Sandell discussed the decoding and encoding of art by identifying how the work “is,” what the work is about and when, where, by whom and why the work was created or valued. Continue reading

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Speaker highlights trans issues and identities

By Melissa Reed
Correspondent

Students sat eagerly waiting for transgender writer, speaker and media personality Tyler Ford to grace the Library Auditorium stage on Thursday, April 7. Ford’s visit to the College was part of PRISM’s annual Trans Awareness Week, which is designed to educate the College’s student body on trans identities and issues.

“We saw the opportunity to bring Tyler and jumped on it,” sophomore chemistry major and Education Advocacy Chair for PRISM Max Nazario said. “Tyler is a major figure in today’s social-media-centered world and they’re working hard to further the conversation on gender to include talk of nonbinary and gender-nonconforming identities. We saw bringing them to campus as a great way to bring that conversation to the student body at TCNJ.” Continue reading

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From New Orleans to the Lions Den

By Dorian Armstrong
Correspondent

The College’s sixth-annual Mardi Gras Masquerade kicked off another night of fun, food and fabulous music on Wednesday, April 6. The event celebrated the culture of New Orleans and brought a touch of the Louisiana city to the College. Organized by the Alternative Break Club (ABC), with a little help from Beck’s Cajun Cafe and the Bon Temps Brass Band, the free event drew a large crowd of students, including both long-time ABC volunteers and first-time attendees, to the Lions Den.

Senior art education major and ABC historian Amanda Intili made sure to note that the festivities were all for a good cause. Continue reading

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‘Vanya and Sonia’ reveals hilarity and heart

By Alyssa Apuzzio
Staff Writer

The Don Evans Black Box Theater in Kendall Hall was bursting with laughter during four nights of the comedy “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike,” which was performed by All College Theatre (ACT). The theater was filled with students of the College, faculty and members of the public.

Brought to life by a small cast consisting of only six actors, “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” ran from Wednesday, April 6, to Saturday, April 9. The skilled theater group was excellent in creating the comical, dramatic and serious atmospheres that the script required. Continue reading

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‘SVU’ prepares for season 17 wrap

By Danielle Silvia
Staff Writer

The 17th season of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” is currently underway and has seen many twists and turns throughout its episodes. As this season prepares to come to a close, so much can be taken away from this season and thought about in anticipation for the next one.

Benson struggles to balance her work and love life. (AP Photo)
Benson struggles to balance her work and love life. (AP Photo)

Many fans were shocked to learn that Nick Amaro, played by Danny Pino, would not return for this season. His role, however, was soon replaced by a young, in-training detective named Dominick Carisi, Jr. But as he always reminds people, you can “call (him) Sonny.” Carisi’s role as a fresh, inexperienced member of the Special Victims Unit (SVU) soon evolved into a much more active and rounded character. Carisi has led many of the investigations, even nabbing some of the perpetrators himself. In one episode, he spends two weeks undercover in a halfway house trying to figure out which resident was secretly a rapist. He had to defend himself multiple times, as many people thought he was a criminal, but he eventually ended up finding the culprit and saving many others from attacks. Carisi has thus become a full-fledged member of the SVU team through his development as a character this season. Continue reading

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Athletic Director Sharon Beverly steps down

By Pat McCarthy                                                                                     Correspondent

After two years at the College, Sharon Beverly has stepped down as athletic director and vice president for Student Affairs. Beverly was the fourth athletic director at the College and the first female to hold the position. She arrived on the campus after spending 10 years at Vassar College, where she held the same position, according to information provided by the College’s Athletic Department.

The campus community was notified that Beverly was stepping down from her position via an email sent out on Thursday, March 31, by Vice President for Student Affairs Amy Hecht. Hecht highlighted Beverly’s achievements and thanked her for all she has done for the College, while wishing her luck in the future on behalf of the campus community. Continue reading

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The cease-fire has not decreased tensions between the two countries.  AP Photo

Azerbaijan and Armenia agree to a cease-fire

By Zahra Memon
Correspondent

On Sunday, April 3, Azerbaijan and Armenia, neighboring countries located in the South Asian subcontinent, agreed on a cease-fire after feuding for decades. In the four days prior to the cease-fire, fighting between the two escalated, CNN reported. The Armenian separatists and Azeri defense ministry publicized the cease-fire, calling an end to the war.

However, according to CNN, after the cease-fire, the Armenian News Agency reported that Azerbaijan continued to attack the Armenians. Martakert, a region in Nagorno-Karabakh, has been the reason for dispute and is currently occupied by Armenian forces, but claimed by Azerbaijan. Continue reading

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States to increase food stamp restrictions

By Catherine Herbert
Staff Writer

Of the roughly 45 million people on food stamps in America, hundreds of thousands could be cut off as states begin to reintroduce time limits and work requirements that were previously deferred due to the nation’s high unemployment rates in recent years, according to the New York Times.

Those most affected are expected to be childless adults with lower incomes and the cuts could start as early as this month. The New York Times reported that the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities predicted that anywhere between 500,000 to 1 million people will lose benefits seen from the food stamp program, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), as it is now called. Continue reading

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