Classic Signals: Recycling Plan

Every week, Features Editor Lily Firth hits the archives and finds old Signals that relate to current College topics and top stories.

As the temperature fluctuates rapidly this winter, people are becoming increasingly worried about climate change creating such haphazard weather. While environmental movements are more popular than ever before, plans to prevent global warming and preserve the environment have been in place long before today’s climate change protests. In 1990, the College implemented a new environmentally friendly recycling plan.

Recycling remains important to keep the planet healthy and clean (Photo courtesy of the TCNJ Digital Archive).

The Trenton State College recycling plan is alive and well, and has been approved by Mercer County Improvement Authority, according to TSC’s director of facilities, Ron Tola.

Director Tola believes the success of the program is due to the students’ and staff’s awareness of the environmental problems of today and their desire to do their part in providing a better environment for the future.

Much of the success of the new recycling program can be attributed to Bill Czajka, James Allen and Mike Maconi, facilities employees, according to Tola. He believes these employees are doing a great job in adjusting to the dynamics and management of TSC’s recycling program.

“It is good because it is recycling,” Michael Steimple says. “My roommate divides it into the proper bins for us.”

“Recycling is the least we can do to help preserve the environment,” says Kathy Maguire of Decker Hall.

Ron Geraci of Cromwell Hall feels he is personally trying to do his part.

Joan C. Manto, secretary of the history department, says, “Most of the time I remember to save the paper; it is not hard to do.”

Manto thinks she is becoming more aware of recycling and hopes it will help solve our environmental woes.

Angelika Kluge of Travers says, “I think it’s a good idea. I come from Germany and we have recycling programs like this.”

“We have been recycling for years. It should be as automatic as washing your hands,” says Adele Talone, cashier in the Bursar’s Office.

According to Robin Morris of New Residence Hall, the “dropoff’ point cans are always full in her dormitory. She thinks this is an indication that the “recycling is working well.”

Stephanie Tziarri says, “I think it’s wonderful that we are actually doing something to save our planet from destruction.”

Kim Pelt of Wolfe Hall says it is a good program, but finds the separating of colored and noncolored paper to be a bother.

Dr. Harrod, Chairman of the English Department, says, “It’s not as hard as it might have been … recycling habits at home make you aware of the program.”

Cooperation has been excellent according to Director Tola. The program is in an evolutionary cycle which is bringing changes daily. These changes will demand even greater participation from all sectors of the College. Director Tola lauds the overall cooperation at TSC.

Editor’s note: Although it appears that some people are recycling, many TSC residents are not. Please do your part and recycle.