Recital series offers range of rhythms

By Corinne Castaldo
Staff Writer

A myriad of melodies could be heard from Mayo Concert Hall on Tuesday, Nov. 28, as music students showcased their talent at the Afternoon Recital Series.

Mellies creates a deep atmosphere with his alto saxophone. (Kim Iannarone / Photo Editor)
Mellies creates a deep atmosphere with his alto saxophone. (Kim Iannarone / Photo Editor)

The first performance was a bouncy marimba piece played by sophomore music major James Fox. Fox played a rendition of Clair Omar Musser’s “Etude in B Major, No. 9.” The fast-paced airy rhythm was an excellent start to the recital as a whole.

For the next performance, sophomore music education major Maxeene Lidlow sung a beautiful mezzo soprano rendition of Reynaldo Hahn’s “Trois jours de vendange,” which translates from French to “Three days during the harvest.” The long, drawn out notes of this song flowed pleasantly through the hall.

Lidlow beamed with pride while talking about her performance.

“I was pretty calm,” Lidlow said. “This isn’t my first performance, so I am used to being on the stage by now.”

French music was featured often throughout the afternoon, as junior music education major Maxwell Mellies performed an alto saxophone rendition of Paule Maurice’s “Tableaux de Provence” (Pictures of Provence). This piece offered smooth, melancholic notes.

Keeping with the French theme, junior early childhood education and music double major Courtney Woods performed a dazzling soprano rendition of Claude Debussy’s “Beau soir” (Beautiful evening).

Junior music education major Jessica Richter played the first flute performance of the afternoon, keeping the audience in high spirits with the fast-paced “Flute Concerto in D Major” by Carl Reinecke.

This was freshman music education major Kathryn Cole’s most anticipated performance.

“It’s important for me to support my fellow music majors,” Cole said. “We always come out to see each other. I’m most excited for the two flute performances.”

The second flute performance featured junior music education major Caroline Hoynowski’s rendition of Reinecke’s flute and piano sonata “Undine.” Much like the first flute piece, this song’s bouncy rhythm brought a cheerful atmosphere to the hall.

Hoynowski attributed the success of the concert to her previous experience.

“It’s always pretty nerve-wracking, but I was well prepared,” Hoynowski said. “This is my third performance, so I am used to being on stage.”

Noah Possible, a freshman music education major, performed a fantastic rendition of George Frideric Handel’s “Si, tra i ceppi” (Yes, even in chains) from the opera “Berenice.” The song was performed in Italian, with a light, bouncy rhythm that universally resonated with the audience.

The final performance of the afternoon was a remarkable duo of Friedrich Burgmüller’s “Three Nocturnes” with senior biology major Holly Torsilieri on the cello and junior music education major Mark Juliano on the classical guitar. The cello took the forefront of this performance, while the guitar complemented with background rhythm.

The recital concluded with thunderous applause for the performers from their friends and family in the audience.