The Chainsmokers change sound on ‘Memories’

By Lily Firth
Staff Writer

The Chainsmokers released its highly anticipated album, “Memories Do Not Open,” on April 7. The electronic music-producing duo transitioned from their classic EDM style to more typical types of pop music.

Some love the album, saying it nailed the transition to pop and this shows with the album sales being pretty high. Still, others say that the group was just trying to get on the radio to increase sales, adding that this brand of pop music is the same sleepy melodies we have been hearing for years.

The Chainsmokers’s music has evolved into a more pop-friendly sound. (Flickr)

There is no doubt that The Chainsmokers is a very talented group, so, of course, the album wasn’t a complete flop, but some of the songs were mediocre, with just bland beats layered in the background.

The majority of the songs were still very enjoyable even if the sound was a little repetitive. You can hear little bits of “I Want Something Just Like This,” featuring Coldplay, in the group’s other tracks like “Don’t Say” and “Bloodstream.” But the consistency isn’t bad. It gives off a relaxed pop sound.

The third track on the album, “Bloodstream,” had a more mellow sound. What surprised me was that the slow songs were actually my favorite ones on the album. They were raw with personal and emotional lyrics and soft music in the background.

The group, of course, has some of its trademark Chainsmoker sounds as well, making the songs extra fun to dance to.

The pace picks up with “Break Up Every Night,” a song about a girlfriend who puts him on an emotional roller coaster. “She’s got seven personalities/everyone’s a tragedy. … She wants to break up every night.” Though the lyrics are repetitive, they’re clearly not meant for a close inspection. It sounds exactly like what it’s supposed to be –– a lighthearted dance song to get people going.

Many of the songs are already hits, such as dance hits “Paris” and “Something Just Like This.” They collaborate with other popular bands, as well, such as Florida Georgia Line and Coldplay.

Emily Warren, who’s featured on “Don’t Say,” brings the song to life. Her soft falsetto voice in the chorus complements the electronic sound nicely, and the subtle harmony only adds to the song’s smooth movement.

The Chainsmokers let vocals lead the way for the music, however, this becomes a problem when the singer’s voice is not that strong. In “Honest,” the lead vocalist doesn’t carry the song the way Warren did in “Don’t Say,” and the whole track suffers because of it. The electronic beats fade to the background of listeners who don’t know to appreciate the group more for their techno sound.

Definitely give the album more of a chance, especially when it is debuting in the wake of many other famous musicians, such as Ed Sheeran and Harry Styles. The Chainsmokers still hit the charts with relative success, and I believe the album will continue to be a success.