Celebritease: Celebrities join women’s march

By Mackenzie Cutruzzula
Columnist

On Saturday, Jan. 21, millions of Americans gathered across the world to protest against President Donald Trump’s first day in office. Celebrities, both men and women, joined the women’s march to stand up for women’s rights.

Actress America Ferrera kicked off the Washington D.C. assembly with a speech.

“But the president is not America,” Ferrera said. “His cabinet is not America. Congress is not America. We are America.”

Woman's march DC
Women march in Washington DC. (Flickr)

The protest in Washington D.C. also featured speeches from Gloria Steinem, Madonna and Scarlett Johansson. 

Using Instagram and Twitter as a platform, celebrities further showed their support.

Lena Dunham and Amy Schumer maintained live updates from the protests on social media, which featured photos with Amy Poehler and Uzo Aduba. Emma Watson was spotted on social media asking police to move a barricade, so she could interact with other activists.

Vanessa Hudgens, Bella Thorne and Chrissy Teigen also kept up a social media presence during the march. Teigen took on backlash from Twitter users as she commented on Trump’s inaugural address. She tweeted about how the negative comments inspired her to skip the Sundance Film Festival and head to Washington D.C. instead.

On Saturday, the famous film festival also held a walk in solidarity with the movement, where Teigen’s husband John Legend took part.  

Jake Gyllenhaal accompanied his sister Maggie Gyllenhaal to the march, while Katy Perry marched with her sister Angela Hudson.

“My heart is most proud to march with my blood sister, Angela, who has always been my guardian angel. We should all be guardians for each other,” Perry wrote on Instagram.

Ferrera’s “Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” co-star Amber Tamblyn marched alongside Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

“Jane the Virgin” star Gina Rodriguez posted a picture from the march wearing a T-shirt that read, “Torch Your Bra.”

Melissa Benoist proved she was a real-life “Supergirl” by marching with a sign that said, “Hey Donald, don’t try to grab my pussy — it’s made of steel.”

Trump Sign
Activists hold signs in support of strong women. (Flickr)

Across the pond, actor Lin-Manuel Miranda tweeted from the women’s march in London.

After only 24 hours of being a private citizen, former Secretary of State John Kerry marched in Washington D.C. accompanied by his dog.

In Los Angeles, Miley Cyrus represented the Happy Hippie Foundation, proving that the movement was inclusive for all.

Although not spotted in person, Meryl Streep was represented on T-shirts and signs at various protests. Signs read, “What Meryl said” and “Meryl is accurately rated.” Other celebrities that did not physically march, such as Taylor Swift and Kim Kardashian, tweeted about their support for the movement.  

Around the world, artists, entertainers and actors stood alongside everyday men and women to push for issues that predominantly face women. Watching this movement was inspiring and uplifting. While typically only celebrity’s materialistic moments are reported on, this movement made me proud to write about the historic moment featuring these talented figures.