College should consider cutting Winter Break

The Ed Building is covered in snow as students move back to campus to begin the semester.  (Tom Ballard / Opinions Editor)
The Ed Building is covered in snow as students move back to campus to begin the semester. (Tom Ballard / Opinions Editor)

By Kelly Corbett

Looking back at the almost six-week winter hiatus that we had in order to recover from the semester grind, the nights of little sleep and the mornings of too much caffeine with far too many pages still left to read, I guess it was a nice, stress-free break. Unlike during the semester, I didn’t have any urges to throw my textbook out the window or take a nap at 2 p.m., for I wasn’t sleep-deprived or trying to avoid responsibilities. I functioned more like a human being and less like a confused college student trying to get her life together every morning before her 11 a.m class. Yet, despite all the positive aspects of a long winter break, I can’t help but feel like it was just too ridiculously long.

O.K., I know what you’re thinking: Is this chick really complaining about time off from school? Is she that nerdy? Is she that weird? Yes, yes and yes. But let me elaborate. This winter break, I saw some old high school friends, I celebrated the holidays with my family and I was able to shorten my never-ending to-do list that always seems to duplicate during the semester. But basically, that’s ALL I did over winter break.

I wouldn’t consider it an accomplishment to finish a whole TV series on Netflix or fall asleep at 4 a.m. every morning over break. I felt like an unemployed 35 year old who was living on a strict diet of pizza, Christmas candies and hot chocolate. All mail, phone calls or inquiries for me could be directed to the blanket and pillow fort built on my bed.

While winter break is supposed to be a “recharge session,” I was at 100 percent by the beginning of January and these extra few weeks didn’t benefit me in any way. It’s not like I could find a job for just six weeks, especially since most retail stores hire seasonal employees whose employment ends after the holidays. Anyway, jobs and internships are usually tasks I take on in the summer. I was ready to dive headfirst into spring semester after just three weeks of winter break, but the College wasn’t expecting us back until Sunday, Jan. 24, while the majority of my home friends started class a week or two earlier.

I hate not knowing what’s next, not having a busy schedule and rolling out of bed in the afternoon only to ask myself, “Gee, what am I going to do today?” I’d rather be super busy than super bored. I’d rather be outlining a textbook than walking around my house or driving around my town trying to find something to do. During the semester, at least at the end of the day, I could look back and tell myself all that I accomplished something. But over winter break, I wasn’t productive. I’m sure I’m not the only person at the College that feels this way.

The College’s calendar is already planned out for the next couple of years and I’ll have long been graduated before this could be put into action, but perhaps a shorter break could be considered. Most of my high school friends had a month-long break this winter while I was home for an extra two weeks.

Is the winter session at the College the cause for the delay? I’d like to know what causes this exceptionally long recess. A shorter winter break could ultimately result in a longer summer break, which is when I feel most college students, like myself, are able to work at part-time jobs and take on internships. But for now, I shall excuse myself because, as I’m writing this, it’s still winter break and I’m going to watch another episode on Netflix.