The Signal asks … If it were possible, should the Confederate flag be banned in the US?

Alessandra Testa, junior international studies major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)
Alessandra Testa, junior international studies major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)

“There needs to be a very clear discussion about the implications of (the flag). Since I’m not from the south, it’s not up for me to decide. People can use it for whatever they want, but not like the white supremacy (we saw) over the summer. We need to meet each other halfway, like not have it in public areas or in front of government buildings.”

 

 

 

 

Gerard Giordano, freshman political science major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)
Gerard Giordano, freshman political science major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)

 

 

 

“You can’t be showing the Confederate flag on state grounds. Those should be kept in museums. We can’t forget history. We have to remember it so we don’t repeat it.”

 

 

 

 

Carly Mastrogiacomo, freshman nursing major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)
Carly Mastrogiacomo, freshman nursing major. (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)

 

 

“Just having one is not a problem unless problems arise from it. I was in Maine and I saw some of them. I wasn’t used to (that).”

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Prestera, junior special education and history double major.  (Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)
Anna Prestera, junior special education and history double major.
(Chelsea LoCascio / Opinions Editor)

 

 

“I don’t think it should be banned, but it’s disrespectful to our country now. The flag has no meaning anymore.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans find an appropriate use for the flag post-banishment. (Illustration courtesy of  Raphaëlle Gamanho)
Americans find an appropriate use for the flag post-banishment. (Illustration courtesy of Raphaëlle Gamanho)