Nick Santino packs the Rathskeller

By Alena Woods
Correspondent

The Rathskeller was alive Friday, Jan. 31, with the sounds of Nick Santino and the Northern Wind reverberating throughout the entire Brower Student Center.

Santino’s original acoustic sound draws in crowds. (Courtney Wirths / Photo Editor)
Santino’s original acoustic sound draws in crowds. (Courtney Wirths / Photo Editor)

“The event was so packed that there weren’t enough seats for everyone,” freshman biology major Evan Abernerthy said. “There were people standing at the back of the Rat trying to just to get a glimpse.”

One of the major reasons most people stayed was that there were two extremely talented acts performing. The New Royalty opened for Nick Santino, and they brought a fun and light atmosphere to the performance.

Even though The New Royalty was a rather unknown band, after their performance and their display of original music and talents, many were interested in seeing more.

“The opening act, the New Royalty, sounded a lot like Paramore and were really very talented,” freshman English major Brooke Schmidt said. “I’m probably seeing them in March when they play with We the Kings.”

After the New Royalty played, Nick Santino and the Northern Wind was introduced. Santino played one of his more popular songs titled, “A Rocket to the Moon,” along with other lesser-known original songs.

Even though the audience didn’t know all of his songs’ lyrics, they still displayed a great deal of energy and excitement by clapping and singing along to what they did know.

His acoustic guitar-based music and strong vocals closely parallel the styles of his musical idols Johnny Cash and Tom Petty, who he listed in an interview with musicboxpete.com.

Santino undoubtedly has an original sound and talent to complement that. He writes his own songs and plays a multitude of instruments, a strong suit he often displays in his work.

Besides the musical part of the show, the bands’ openness and willingness to speak to the audience members after the show was one of the greatest takeaways of the evening.

“Personally, my favorite part was how accessible the acts were afterward to talk to,” Schmidt said. “Nick and I talked for a little bit too and he was really genuine and funny.”

Being able to connect with the acts is the one major and positive difference between other types of concerts — the ability for the acts to connect to their audiences is just as important and relevant as their performances.

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