Fall Out Boy’s rocky return

By Karl Delossantos
Correspondent

Unless you live under a rock with no Wi-Fi, chances are good that you’ve heard that the alternative rock band Fall Out Boy is back to recording music after going on an indefinite hiatus in 2009.

The news of their return rocked the web earlier this year, when they announced their fifth studio album, “Save Rock and Roll.”

After a four year hiatus, Fall Out Boy attempts to break punk rock barriers. (AP Photo)

Fall Out Boy has never been afraid to experiment with various genres, and this album is no exception. While Pete Wentz’s lyrics remain largely narrative, their sound has more of a pop quality than any of their previous albums.

The album’s lead single, “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark (Light Em’ Up),” and opening track, “The Phoenix,” are probably the closest to rock you will get. However, both tracks show a blurred line between pop and rock, a trend that continues throughout the album.

“Alone Together” is cast from the quintessential pop song mold. The song features a catchy chorus and smooth vocals from Stump, while “Miss Missing You” features the same pop sound with a bubbly quality added to the song.

The track “Just One Yesterday” features the British singer Foxes, who is one of several guest performers on the album, in a mix of harmonies that is just transcendent.

However, she may be the only guest star who adds to her track. Big Sean, who is featured on the song “The Mighty Fall,” has to compete with the song’s mighty guitar riffs, while Courtney Love is drowned out by the punk anthem of “Rat A Tat.”

The title track to the album is a power pop rock anthem featuring Elton John that I believe sums up the sound of the album. It has catchy beats and melodies that highlight Stump’s talent as a vocalist, but there is a noticeable change in energy.

“Save Rock and Roll” is going to disapoint a lot of faithful fans who prefer the pure punk rock sound that launched the band, but it is great to see a band brave enough to ignore genre lines.