Officers prepare for Homecoming

SG listens to campus police’s concerns for Homecoming. (Chandler Hart-McGonigle / Staff Photographer)

With Homecoming plans in full swing, Campus Police are preparing for the festivities as well. At the Student Government meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 10, Chief John Collins discussed Campus Police security measures for Homecoming.

Although undercover cops will not be surveying the event, there will be “plain-clothed patrol.” Undercover cops would ask students for an alcoholic drink, or even offer them one, explained Collins.

The plain-clothed police officers will just patrol the event for suspicious activity.

It is not yet known how many police officers will be at Homecoming.

“Nobody should be worried about it,” Collins said.  “It’s pretty easy to pick up on.”

Pleased with the increasing success of the past homecoming events, Campus Police will continue to have plain-clothed patrol if it remains effective.

Last year, one student had to be transported to the hospital due to excessive drinking. In the previous year, three students had to be transported.

“Our goal for the day is to make sure everybody has a safe and enjoyable event,” Collins said. “We want to see everybody come home safely.”

He urged students to have a designated driver if they are going off campus.

SG also passed two new bills at the meeting.

The first bill revised the current attendance policy for SG members. Using a points system, members lose points for missing general body meetings, retreats and internal committee meetings.

Program participation points could be earned through attending SG-sponsored events.

A member must uphold attendance and participation points to remain an active member of SG each semester.

“You would be getting credit for acting out your role as an SG member,” said Christina Kopka, SG president and senior Spanish and marketing double major.

The other bill renamed associate members of SG as general members.

During the debate to pass this bill, some SG members believed the new title of “general member” could confuse them with being part of the general body.

General Body members must be voted in, attend meetings regularly, and can vote on bills.

“It gives them more of an upbeat title,” said Kyle Magliaro, senior marketing major and executive vice president of SG.

The search for the position of provost to be filled is coming to an end, narrowing the pool down to three possible candidates. This final candidate hired will become second in command to the College president.

SG members were encouraged to attend the candidate meeting interviews.

The Building our Futures Campaign will be launched at the College. The College could be granted $22 to $26 million to help build academic buildings.

“It is simply checking ‘Yes’ on the bottom of the ballot,” Kopka said. Students can support the referendum on the ballot in November.