Sexism in contemporary music

By Sophie Kay

Recently, one of my good friends suggested I check out Childish Gambino. Generally speaking, I am not into rap music, but I decided to give it a shot. Donald Glover, the person behind the name Childish Gambino, is well-known as an actor of the TV show “Community” and was previously a writer for “30 Rock.” Without a doubt, he is a clever lyricist and very talented. At first, I thought his music was fun and catchy. But then I started listening a little more closely.
“Freaks and Geeks,” likely his most famous song, caught my attention. He says, “My dick is made of carrots, bunnies wantin’ to be fed” and “E.E. cummin’ on her face, now that’s poetry in motion.”
What I want to know is why someone with such a brilliant and creative mind is lowering themselves. Glover has a Writer’s Guild of America Award. Although clearly skillful with words, the meaning behind them are quite crass.
Childish Gambino is not the worst in any way. A majority of rappers do this same thing and to a more severe degree. Soulja Boy’s song “Crank Dat (Soulja Boy)” repeats “superman that hoe,” which according to urbandictionary.com, is when a man ejaculates on a girl’s back and then sticks the sheets to her, so when she wakes up in the morning she has a cape.
Meanwhile, Lupe Fiasco’s most famous song “Kick, Push” is about skateboarding.
I want to know why we are drawn to this music. Considering that women make up half of the population, it can’t be only men listening to make songs popular. So why do women enjoy this music? Why do women even tolerate it?
One could argue that rappers aren’t actually sexist and don’t mean what they say. But with these songs, the media perpetuates the idea that this behavior is acceptable. Men will think it’s okay to not respect women, some women will think it’s normal not to be respected. We can’t help but listen to the media.
These songs might be catchy, but I think I’ll stick to Lupe Fiasco.