Indie-poppers and synth-jockeys land at the Rat

Brooklyn's Savoir Adore closed a month-long tour with a whimsical Friday night set at the Rat. (Elizabeth Yacone).

By Melissa Radzimski
Correspondent

“Cheeseburgers, basketball and imagination.” These are the things that influence indie-pop band Savoir Adore, according to lead vocalist, guitarist and keyboardist, Paul Hammer.

Savoir Adore finished its month-long tour at the College on Friday, March 26 with openers Love Like Deloreans. Both Brooklyn-based bands put on a College Union Board (CUB)-sponsored show that was nothing short of imaginative for an unfortunately unresponsive and small crowd in the Rathskeller.

The show began with the instrumental synth-pop trio Love Like Deloreans, which consisted of Lorna Krier, Derek Muro and Peter Pearson.

Although some of their songs sounded as if they were extracted from the “Spyro the Dragon” soundtrack, Love Like Deloreans remained consistent to their ’80s new wave roots. In fact, as the band transitioned between two songs, it felt as if an actual flying Delorean landed on stage. But that’s exactly what made “Brooklyn’s cutest band” enjoyable.

Their psychedelic and futuristic sound was so full of childlike wonder that it was impossible not to feel happier while they played.

Shortly after Deloreans, Savoir Adore dazzled the stage with a charming, hour-long set. Their head-bopping and smiling were as infectious as frontrunners Deidre Muro’s and Paul Hammer’s sugarcoated vocals.

Slightly reminiscent of the Canadian band Stars, Savoir Adore was just as clean-cut and romantic. The combination of two synths, a bass, a drum and two guitars naturally and effortlessly meshed into a mold of twee pop with hints of ’80s influence.

However, they somehow managed to transcend the hipster sound that their hometown of Brooklyn tends to mass-produce these days.

“We’re pop rock, kind of sparkly and imaginative,” said Deidre Muro, who also provides synths for Adore.

“They sound like a cross between Arcade Fire, Phantom Planet and Girls,” Kyle Tomalin, freshman communication studies major, said.

The twosome said they created Savoir Adore unintentionally after they played around with their synthesizers one weekend in Hammer’s house in upstate New York. Just this month, they performed at Austin’s South by Southwest festival.

Aside from the band, Hammer and Muro also do post-production work and voiceovers for MTV. Their upbeat, synth-saturated jingle currently plays on MTV before and after commercial breaks to promote the station.