Weak apocalypse and Bateman are white noise

Extract’ is ‘king’ of subtlety

Don’t expect “Extract” to be “Office Space,” the endlessly quotable cult classic that puts jokes first and plot second. However, do expect it to be more like director Mike Judge’s TV project, “King of the Hill,” a consistently funny look at American suburban workers who eventually learn to appreciate what they have.

In “Extract,” Joel (Jason Bateman) runs an extract factory, full of apathetic workers biding their time while looking for something better. Sexually frustrated at home, and jaded and bored at work, Joel is prepared to sell the factory. But a freak accident and subsequent lawsuit gets in the way, along with other random failed schemes.

This is a light but thoughtful comedy, in which everybody overreaches their grasp, recoils, and eventually realizes the value of what they already possess. It may not be side-splitting or ground-breaking, but it’s smart, and the fantastic cast with J. K. Simmons, Kristen Wiig, and Ben Affleck will keep you laughing and thinking the whole way.

—Nathan Fuller

ShaneAcker-9poster-770058‘9’ is a nightmare for Burton fans

It is always interesting to see the use of computer animation targeted toward older audiences. The technology often allows audiences to imagine incredible new worlds with stunning detail. This is where “9” truly shines, providing viewers with a post-apocalyptic world that is brooding in an atmosphere of trepidation.  Unfortunately, “9” doesn’t offer much else.

That is not to say the movie is a complete waste of time. In fact, some of the action sequences are outright exhilarating. The motion technology utilized to present the film’s animated world is a rollercoaster ride for the senses. This, combined with its 80 minute running time, makes this flick a fun and painless experience.

However, while “9” is a feast for the eyes, the plot lacks substantial development. The film revolves around a group of rag dolls that are left to survive after mankind has been completely wiped out. Beyond this, the action and conclusion fail to offer a satisfying ending.

—Jason Seyler