Forrester focuses on taxes and corruption

Whether we all know it or not, a big election is approaching. No, Hillary supporters, it is not 2008 yet. Put away your banners.

In fact, this is the year for the New Jersey gubernatorial race. I know this fact has not aroused the passions of so many in this state or the attentions of too many major media outlets, but this race is critical to our state.

The position is one of the most powerful in the nation, and we need a competent, honest and inventive leader to fill this position. This man is Doug Forrester.

He will restore our state government to a good bill of financial health, take an ax to the widespread corruption and most importantly, take steps to repair the maligned image of New Jersey and our government.

Forrester, a successful self-made businessman, has lived in this state for 30 years. He is not a career politician, but has had crucial political experience working in former Gov. Tom Kean’s administration as assistant state treasurer. Most significantly, the Republican candidate has made the two most important citizen concerns – property taxes and government corruption – to be the two greatest focal points of his campaign of reform.

Forrester does not promise the taxpayers flashy spending programs, but focuses instead on giving real relief to all New Jersey families and has promised a 30 percent tax cut in three years.

Our residents and businesses need lower taxes.

Our ranking of competitiveness in the business world plummeted this year from 26th to 44th in the country, as debt from the past four years of the McGreevey regime piled up.

As the state with the “great honor” of having the highest property taxes in the nation, we are forcing many of our middle-class residents and businesses to seriously consider moving away.

This should not be happening. We need real relief now. What we do not need, however, is more tax rebates like the ones the Democratic candidate, Sen. Jon Corzine, has presented.

They have been offered in New Jersey for years, but afforded no real relief.

The senator promises “moderate property tax relief” and claims Forrester’s plan will blow a $9 billion hole in our budget.

Forrester contends it will be closer to $3.2 billion over several years. Most alarmingly, Corzine promised a “new policy” of “invest, grow and prosper” in exchange for the old “tax, borrow and spend.”

Apparently, the senator expects you and me to overlook that he will pay for his massive new spending projects with borrowed money from public bonding.

He also refuses to sign a pledge to promise to never raise taxes.

It is quite pathetic that Corzine’s campaign cannot even keep a promise in a simple slogan.

Corzine also promises to rise above all of the corruption and clean up Trenton, citing his “record in Congress.”

Someone needs to inform the senator that we have been having problems in New Jersey and he didn’t say a word about them until he ran for governor.

Forrester, on the other hand, has spoken out repeatedly against corruption, especially in the case of our former governor, Jim McGreevey.

What is especially disheartening is Corzine’s behavior at the Democratic National Convention in 2004, shortly before McGreevey resigned.

After the former governor spoke, the senator went up to the podium, fondly embraced him and raised his hand saying “our governor.”

He later said he was proud of McGreevey.

Consider also the senator’s press release on the event of McGreevey’s resignation, – “I applaud the governor’s decision to acknowledge a part of his identity for which he owes no one an apology,” Corzine said.

Once again, Corzine is dead wrong. McGreevey and the Democrats do owe us an apology.

They owe us an apology for the embarrassment they have caused this great state and the financial disaster that is the statehouse.

Moreover, how can Corzine pledge to end corruption when predominately Democrat bosses like George Norcross, Charles Kushner and Sharpe James have been propagating it? Will he prosecute his own party? I say he will not.

My fellow students, it’s high time we shook off this unhealthy aura of apathy and opened our eyes.

You may not currently pay property taxes or care about corruption in Trenton, but you will very soon. Moreover, your parents are suffering under the burden of the highest property taxes in the nation. We need real relief, not gimmicks, broken promises and enslavement to party bosses.

Doug Forrester is the man we need in the statehouse. Election Day is Nov. 8. Do what you think is right.

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