March For Life brings together anti-abortion crusaders

It was a very cold day immediately after the storms and my car was still half buried in snow.

I traveled over 150 miles in a bus that day with eight other students and 40 people who you would never expect to participate in any form of public protest. But, we still went protesting because we had a mission. Our mission was to affirm that every human being has a right to live. Yes, my friends, I was going to the March for Life in Washington, D.C.

What is the March for Life? It is a time when pro-lifers from all over the United States converge on Washington annually in protest of the Roe v. Wade decision. In this decision, freedom of choice was declared. This meant a woman has a right to do whatever she wishes with her own body. But that left the doorway open for later court decisions to define what constitutes her body and what her choice means.

It is commonly thought now that anything within a woman is her own body and that if she wants cut out a part of herself, that is perfectly legal.

However, such a decision ignores 30 years of advancements in science that shows that what is inside a pregnant woman is not her own body but a completely separate being with its own blood-type, nervous system and DNA.

Even with the scientific fact that we are dealing with another person, people still ignore that abortion is nothing more than publicly supported murder done by doctors.

In a decision aimed to help poor women in their most desperate straits of either death or poverty, things that have gone completely off course with 1.3 million abortions done per year in the United States alone.

These numbers point to a vast lack of respect for human beings. This shows up in the dramatically rising statistics of domestic abuse, divorce, infanticide and Post-abortion syndrome. These are facts and we can see the immediate rise in all of these after the year 1973, when the decision was made.

Another correlation to this disdain for human life is the slippery slope of further life issues such as cloning and euthanasia. It is an unfortunate fact of human history that people have acted horribly toward one another and, as a race, we are guilty. This is not the type of world I nor anyone who was at the March wish to live in.

If abortion were only legal in cases of rape, incest or whenever a woman’s life was in danger, this would be a whole other issue.

As the facts remain though, these events are only a small fraction of all the reasons people have abortions. Even if a child was born impoverished, that is better than never being born because at least that child could still be adopted and maybe rise above that state.

There may one day be a problem with food production or with caring for these unwanted children or even that we would head to a world where illegal abortions are done at the costs of the lives of women.

But these are societal problems that must be dealt with and are not avoided by abortion, which causes more problems than it solves.

Long after this dark period of history is over and is just a distant memory, I bet abortion will appear to be as strange as slavery appears to us today. In that day, however, there will still be a March for Life.

For so long as there are people being mistreated and unjustly harmed and rights are thrown out to be meaningless, there will be good people aiming to defend the dignity of human life.

Each of us can choose whether we march for ourselves and our desires or whether we march for a better world in which everyone can live happily and freely.

What pro-choice people sometimes forget is that once one chooses death, there are no other choices to be made for whomever they chose to kill.

What I support as a pro-life person is the right for everyone, even the unborn and unheard, to choose what their life will become.