Psychology graduate teaches to a different beat

The life of a musician has always had a certain allure: many dream about the glamour and decadence of the rock-star lifestyle. Danny Britt, a 1995 College alumnus, was not immune to these feelings – he was drawn to the drums and started playing them at age 12.

Church and family gave Britt his first exposure to the drums.

“I used to go to a church that had a great folk band which included a drummer and (he) was great,” he said. “Also, my older brother was in a rock band. I began lessons with one of the best drummers in my town soon after that.”

Now, Britt is passing these lessons on by giving drum lessons in his town of Dumont, located in Bergen County.

One may wonder why someone with such an enthusiasm for playing and teaching the drums would choose to major in psychology, as Britt did. He disagrees with this conclusion, and said regarding his decision, “Psychology underlies every pursuit we are a part of – it affects everything! And, I believe that my psychology studies have been useful in my drum-teaching because if I can strengthen my understanding of human behavior and relations, I can strengthen my drum-teaching practice.”

Britt said one of his main influences is drummer and mentor, Dom Famularo, who authored the psychology book “Cycle of Self-Empowerment.”

Britt said he has nothing but fond memories of the College. He has always considered the quality of the education to be excellent and is not at all surprised by the recognition the College has received.

During his time at the College, Britt was impressed by the high academic standards, challenging coursework and the intimate, personal environment.

His experience at the College has translated into success in his adult life. Britt worked on Wall Street and in financial services for a couple of years. Now he works several temporary office jobs to supplement his drumming income.

Britt also participates in the production of a drum radio show based in New York City and has been published in “Modern Drummer” magazine. Despite his lack of a sense of permanent financial stability, Britt attributes his present happiness and satisfaction to his involvement with drums. His students only have praise for his abilities as a teacher. One student, Zach Succardi, said of Britt, “I would recommend Dan to the highest regard when it comes studying the drums. He shares his personal experiences and ideas, which helped me see things in a different (light). I’ve developed a friendship with him.”

Britt’s advice to fledgling musicians is applicable to students of every field: “Even if you are pursuing a non-musical career, keep playing your instrument on the side,” he said. “If you don’t, you might feel that something is missing. Passion is real, and it’s like a flame that is eternal: You can try to ignore it, but it doesn’t go away.”

– For more information, call Danny Britt at 201-306-4239 or visit his Web site at