SFB: Inter-Greek Council funded for Alcohol Summit

After the Student Finance Board (SFB) deadlocked in its vote on the Inter-Greek Council’s (IGC) request for $2,810 to help fund its Alcohol Summit, Craig Gross, SFB chairperson, cast the deciding vote in favor of funding.

The request was presented by Kelly Dallavalle, IGC treasurer. She said IGC received a $3,000 grant from the Higher Education Consortium on Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Education. The College was only one of four organizations selected for a grant by the consortium. The summit would take place at the Trenton Marriott. Since the grant would cover most of the expenses, IGC only asked for money to cover its room expenses.

There was widespread debate over whether the request adequately broke down the projected costs and whether it is necessary to have the event off campus.

“Why have it at a hotel?” Kyle Brownlie, junior representative, asked. “Why not have it on campus?”

Dallavalle responded that the summit would be “intense” and having it on campus would cause people to lose focus.

“We don’t do our budget retreat here,” Julia Pratt, director of communications, said, referring to SFB’s annual summit to decide on organizational funding.

But IGC’s listing of $2,100 in the request for “supplies” concerned some board members. Dallavalle said that number included food, a cost that SFB does not traditionally fund.

Bill Carroll, director of finance, pointed out that IGC was not asking for money for the food, and so SFB’s usual policy on that should not matter.

“I don’t feel comfortable funding something that’s not broken down,” Kristofer Disharoon, senior representative, said.

The final vote was 7-6-1 in favor of funding.

The board also considered an Asian American Association (AAA) request for $9,203.96 for its Experience Asia month of events.

Final funding for AAA came to $7,467, to include keynote speaker Parry Shen as well as comedy troupe Stir Friday.

The board gave AAA $650.60 for publicity but cut some costs by opting not to fund food at its “FantASIA” event and by giving the performance artists money to rent a vehicle.

AAA asked to bring two lecturers to the College, but SFB elected to cut one, Giles Li, a spoken word poet, because of the recent “Yellow Rage” spoken word performance on campus.

SFB fully funded $1,975 for The Seal, the College yearbook, to launch a marketing campaign.

The money is for Jostens, the company that produces the yearbooks to send flyers to students’ homes promoting the yearbook and to set up a Web site for credit card orders.

Gross, who helped present the request, argued that funding marketing would be in the board’s best interests.

“If they don’t increase their sales this year, we’re going to have to bail them out at the end of the year (when it can’t pay for production costs),” Gross said.

SFB also unanimously passed its first motion for zero funding of the year, when the Indian Student Association (ISA) asked for $139.89 in reimbursement for a dance performance it held Sept. 25.

Komal Gala, ISA president, told the board that ISA planned on competing in dance competitions each month. This immediately raised concerns.

“Are we willing to spend about $250 a month for this organization?” Carroll asked. “I think if we fund this time, we have to fund every time.”

The board did partially fund, however, a separate request from ISA to perform as a dance troupe on Oct. 9 at Montclair State University. It allocated ISA $182 from the conference request line on an 11-3 vote.

The Gay Union of Trenton State at TCNJ (GUTS) received full funding for its request for $1,429 to bring a photo exhibit about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered families to the library. Men’s club soccer received $200 of a $400 request to play in a local tournament.