Letter: All you need is love?

To the Editor:

This article on “illogical” gay marriages is contradictory and absent of logic itself. Matt Esposito is quick to point out the fact that marriage laws exist for the sole purpose of “strengthening marriage which produces families.” Almost immediately, he states that marriage laws have “nothing to do with love.” How can marriage laws not be based on love and, at the same time, hope to strengthen any family? Perhaps this is a problem on which he should write.

His argument that homosexual couples do not compare to heterosexual couples that cannot have children is also illogical. The fact remains that like homosexual couples, infertile heterosexual couples, cannot have children without outside assistance. Biologically they are comparable, yet there are no laws prohibiting a straight marriage that will not produce children. So that argument too must be discarded. Sorry Matt.

I would like to now address his allegation that the Democratic Party has “turned its back on the American people.” I thought homosexuals living in America constitute American people, but apparently I was wrong.

Arguments contingent on God’s views are immaterial, since it is all irrelevant, because in the United States it does not matter what God thinks. If God hates blue shirts, and I like to wear them, then I get to

wear one every day if I wish to do so, and there is no picket sign, conservative, or preacher that can stop me. This is because we have an amendment that separates church and state in our Constitution. That means that any argument concerning God’s likes and dislikes has no bearing in a discussion concerning the legality of any issue.

I would like to point out, however, that the last time I attended mass the overall message was that of love, not hate. Matt, on the other hand, is quick to point out that hateful picket signs are counterproductive and that we are all guilty of a sin with which God is displeased, whether it be adultery, stealing, or lying. Since it is all the same to Matt, I cannot wait for his editorial on the wrongs of lying.

Finally, I would like to stress the importance of the following point to the author: when writing an editorial, the correct term is “my,” not “our,” because, as I have made quite clear, I disagree with your judgmental and nonsensical argument. It is opinions and arguments like these that segregated high schools and denied women the right to vote. Mother Theresa once said, “If you judge people, you have no time to love them.” I believe that we should all stop concerning ourselves with a “problem” that hurts no one, and start bettering our society through love.

Jeff Ward