California recall puts GOP back in power

Did you know California is a Republican state? Did you know Los Angeles is a Republican county?

Did you know Republicans can win over two-thirds of voters in places like Orange and San Diego Counties, the Inland Empire and the Central Valley?

Californians haven’t seen anything like what happened in the recall election held last week since 1994.

With turnout among registered Californian voters at 60 percent, Schwarzenegger won over his closest rival with a margin of more than 1.3 million votes. Schwarzenegger won 48 percent of the vote in what turned out to be essentially a three-way race.

We heard from the Democrats how someone could win with “as little as 15 percent of the vote.” However, what we saw in California last week looked more like democracy and a clear governing mandate for Schwarzenegger.

Schwarzenegger won heavily among voting men, but he also won among women voters by five percentage points.

He won big in all the key Republican demographic groups and only lost the Hispanic vote (18 percent of the total vote) by 22 percentage points. Republican men and women voted almost identically.

Schwarzenegger carried moderates and independents by substantial margins. He carried conservatives by well over 60 percent even though many of them would have preferred Republican State Sen. Tom McClintock. At the end of the day, conservative voters were looking for someone who could win and who shared their views on all the key issues facing Californians during this crisis.

Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, the Democratic candidate on the second portion of the recall ballot, did not do well during the debate with Schwarzenegger and the other major candidates.

He released a plan to fix California’s problems, calling it “Tough Love.” This is not a very fashionable name for a new economic proposal, especially when you kick it off in a campaign that endorses tax increases almost immediately.

Also, if people were truly fed up with Davis, I think they would have enough sense to avoid voting for someone who supported Davis from the beginning.

In the last nine days, the California Democratic Party launched a last-minute smear campaign of the type I find hard to believe in American elections.

Davis really should have listened to Democratic Attorney General Bill Lockyer, who warned him not to run another campaign based on “puke politics.”

Last year, Davis spent $10 million in the Republican primary in misleading attack ads against Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan, the one Republican who had the best record and the best chance of defeating Davis.

There’s only so much harm you can do to a state before voters finally say that they will not take it anymore.

Davis overspent taxpayers’ money, approved of astronomical rates for energy consumption and misled the public in his analysis of the problems facing California’s state budget.

California has been in serious crisis and voters were mad as hell – according to polls, 72 percent of Californians disapproved of Davis’ job performance.

California may have the largest population of any state, but the size of state deficit is so disproportionately high when compared to every other state that it trumps all other state deficits combined.

Just like Californians could no longer tolerate the property tax problem 25 years ago, this year they voiced their displeasure with “business as usual” in Sacramento.

Schwarzenegger had all the good guys around him: Dick Riordan, former Governor Pete Wilson, Congressman David Dreier of the Inland Empire and many other public officials throughout the state.

They stood up against Davis’ inner circle: labor unions, trial lawyers, teachers unions, the National Organization for Women, the Los Angeles Times and just about every Democratic presidential candidate.

Californians won on Oct. 7. – they reversed what turned out to be a downward spiral by taking out the worst governor in the nation.

Next year, California will hold an election for U.S. Senate and Riordan should really give some thought to entering the race.

He’s done so much to turn Los Angeles around that we could use him in Washington making decisions that affect the nation.