Don’t punch your local cashier, please

Her face turns red, her hands clench, and she is about to let loose a huge temper tantrum right there in front of all the clerks and shoppers in the store.

This is not a spoiled child who is upset because her mother won’t let her get a toy. This is not the over tired toddler who needs a nap. This is the mother, the purported adult who is angry because she must wait for a price check.

This summer, I worked in retail, watching adult after adult cry, yell, scream and/or argue and act, well, like over tired spoiled toddlers.

When I worked part-time in high school, I just dismissed this issue, believing customers to be evil. Now, however, it’s curious why so many people are so angry.

It’s a wonder why so many people are quick to snap.

Is there something in the water? Are people getting too much sun?

People’s attitudes are reflective of their environment. With all the angry customers, there must be something that is different.

A quick overview of the situation provides obvious facts. With the economy in a downturn, people have less money to spend.

Therefore, when they do spend it, they want more, they are more demanding.

With the news spouting off terrorism, murder, death, people are more anxious.

During the blackout last week, a reporter made repeated comments such as, “very much like Sept.11”. I am not kidding. This edginess, bred by a fearful lifestyle, transcends every aspect of the day.

There is a demand for everything to be faster, quicker, easier. Everything from fast food chains, to car washes to movie theaters to retail stores promise an ultra quick experience. Everything must be hassle free.

When something cannot be provided instantaneously, people snap.

But what has happened to general courtesy?

The cashier at the store is not a punching bag for you.

It’s really sad that adults, like immature children, have to take out pent up, burning anxiety on those perceived to be below them.

What people need to do is take account of the quality of their own lives.

Even though the media and television and radio and maybe even your friends tell you to rush, to worry, to lash out – don’t. Act, like, well, an adult.

Learn relaxation techniques. I suggest yoga – take a moment to reflect, not react.