PSA leads 20 in candlelight protest

About 20 students and faculty members gathered in front of Green Hall last Thursday immediately following the anti-war teach-in, to be a part of the rally hosted by the Progressive Student Alliance (PSA).

All those involved held a candle to signify their stand against the war and to remember those who have died.

Mike Curry, member of PSA, said he was very happy with the turn-out at the rally.

“We weren’t expecting a lot of people,” Curry said. “I would have been happy if five people showed.”

Signs and posters reading, “No war in Iraq,” and “Start seeing Iraqi children,” lay on the stairs in front of the building, as many students stood in front of the crowd to share their ideas and feelings about the war.

“We are not going to be silenced by propaganda of war,” freshman PSA member Matt Richman said. “We are doing more than people sitting at home.”

“Organizing on a campus and showing your existence is better than joining in a mass rally in a city because it shows people that resistance exists among your peers,” Curry said.

Cynthia Paces, history professor and a member of the women’s and gender studies program, congratulated the students for being a part of the rally and for helping others who are also against the war.

“This is very healing for them. Thank you for healing many people, and keep the faith,” Paces said.

“It is so awesome that in PSA there are regular people who see injustices around them,” Linda Hamdan, treasurer of the Islamic Society, said. “I’m so proud of them. It gives me so much comfort and support in what I believe.”

Rachel Donohue, member of PSA, gave the crowd a few encouraging words. Donohue said everyone has the power to make a change and if they continue to work together, that change will be made.

“Each one of us has the ability to educate. Everyone here should stand up for what they believe,” Donahue said. “Challenge what you hear. This doesn’t stop here, it starts here. Go out and spread the message,” she added.

Janet Gray, women’s and gender studies professor, who addressed the crowd, said, “I’m up here to preach to the choir. The choir needs to be preached to. It’s like your eating this incredibly nourishing meal. To be with others who feel like us, we need each other, to preach to each other.”