Invasion of the Housing-Snatcher

The housing lottery is back.

With its annual return, it brings with it a storm of emotions. For some upperclass students, there is the joy of just receiving a number. For others, there is the sheer panic of suddenly having to find off-campus housing. And, for the freshmen, there is confusion as to what the fuss is all about.

The fuss, however, becomes clear as soon as they start talking with their crew. Having to pick roommates, suitemates or housemates is like picking teams in grammar school kickball games: someone always gets left out. In simple terms, the housing lottery has ended many friendships.

There is always the fifth person who doesn’t fit into the suite or the townhouse floor. Or, even worse, there is the longtime roommate who didn’t even make the lottery cutoff. There just aren’t enough numbers to go around.

Contrary to what the ambassadors told you as a potential student, not all students who want housing receive it. Many students pull out of the lottery after numbers are posted, knowing that there is no chance they will make the second cutoff.

It is easier and less stressful to look for off-campus housing than it is to wait with baited breath all summer for Residence Life to call and tell you there is an opening in Centennial Hall.

There should be more housing on campus. That’s a fact that nobody can argue against unless he or she is a member of ERACE (Ewing Residents Against College Expansion). For many, that becomes a simple solution to the problem, a quick fix. But no matter how many residence halls are built on campus, the sociological aspect of the problem will never change.

Carefully consider whom you choose to room with, on- or off-campus. But keep in mind, no matter how hard they plan, most students leave college with a roommate horror story or two.

Look on the bright side, however small it may be. These are wonderful tales to scare younger siblings, to elicit sympathy from parents and to trade with friends from home.

Editorial opinions are those of the editorial board, which consists of the Editor-in-chief, the Managing Editor, the Senior Editor and the Opinions Editor unless otherwise noted.